How to successfully argue case for keeping tanks in apartment.

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ichthyogeek

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So the move to LA is just...a lot. And if y'all know me, I'm not satisfied with just one tank. I want ALLLLL the tanks (ok, maybe just 3-4 racks. Which is like, ideal?). But one thing I'm running into as a problem, is that realtors/landlords are nervous about water. Nevermind that I've not had a spill in 8 years....

So...anybody got ideas on how to explain to the landlords that my tanks aren't going to break, spill, or otherwise cause property damage? It would help if I got construction math (floors have a max weight of....? a max pressure of...? tanks do X weight or Y pressure...)
 

ichthyogeek

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You could offer to pay for renter's insurance which would cover any water damage from your aquarium(s). I suppose the language of the insurance policy would have to be specific to aquariums and any damage caused by them.
True...I wonder if Lemonade offers aquarium/water damage insurance
 

DexterB

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Husband is a builder. I do interior design on our jobs.
Apartments might allow Nano tanks. But tanks larger than a Nano, present more concerns for them. Then you are talking about engineers verifying the structure can bear the load bearing weight etc.

The volume of water also can present damage not only to your apartment, but the apartment below you. So that’s another issue the apartment’s are concerned about. Like HF specified you would have to see if the renter’s insurance covered all damage caused.

I think we have some members who are realtors. They may have some input for you of how tank owners managed having tanks in an apartment.
 

Alcatraz

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Giving them facts may help, as I had similar issues owning Huskies as some dog list places have consider them an aggressive breed. Eventually we gave up and decided 2 buy. But I feel for ya as it's not an easy place 2 be in
 

35ppt

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When I was searching for renters insurance last I was not able to find a provider that would cover damage from the tanks. Only damage to the tanks. When I asked at first the rep said yes, but after asking for it in writing he admitted it did not cover it.

During the time I've been keeping tanks I've only rented houses so I've not had much issue with landlords not wanting me keeping tanks. I underestimate my tank size and don't make a big deal about it. The only thing I say is "I've got a 30 gallon fish tank(actually 37, oh and a 20:censored:), is that a problem?" If it is I keep looking and if not I leave it at that. And if I start more tanks later I don't say anything. They're never coming by and the maintenance men couldn't care less. Sometimes it's better to ask for forgiveness than permission. lol

But I could see it being harder to find an apartment that would allow tanks.
 

ichthyogeek

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Teeeeeeeechnically I'm moving with a few 20s and some 10s and a 29...but at the same time, I'm going to have some 55 gallon sumps eventually...

I've found some houses for rent, but most of them are simply too expensive and past my price point. Or scams. Way too many scams.
Giving them facts may help, as I had similar issues owning Huskies as some dog list places have consider them an aggressive breed. Eventually we gave up and decided 2 buy. But I feel for ya as it's not an easy place 2 be in
I'm trying to figure out how to present facts, but the first part is figuring out the facts.

Like...a pound of water's anywhere from 8.3-8.6 pounds. Therefore a 100 gallon system is ~860 pounds. Let's round that up to 1000 pounds to include the stand, tank weights, etc. Across a 48"x 24" size rack, that's around 125 pounds per square foot. Is that a lot? Is that a little? I know a quick google shows that piano's (the heaviest item I can think of) are 40 pounds/square foot.
 

Antics

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It really is going to come down to the building design and construction. Speaking with an engineer is going to be better if you’re trying to make a case for an aquarium and explaining live vs dead loads and placing the tank along exterior walls etc.

Unforuntately speaking with a structural engineer will cost money and even if your aquarium is approved as far as weight you’re still going to have issues with the landlord approval and renters insurance. I’d recommend first finding renters insurance that will for sure include coverage in writing or as a rider. Then speak with prospective landlords about your aquarium and explain the insurance policy and offer to make them the beneficiary of the policy. This will go a long way toward pacifying them.
 

Dierks

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125 pounds per square foot. Is that a lot?
Yes it is, and on top of that most people want to do a 3 or 4 x1 ratio so really you would have to build your structure to hold 375lbs per square foot. You will have to find a place that will allow you to be in the basement with concrete floors. Or in an industrial building...

But to be frank, it will come down to the landlord decision, they are the owners so they get to pick and choose who is in there place and what risks they are willing to take to rent the property.
 

Jessican

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I just didn’t ask...😬 Not that I’m condoning that method. We knew our landlord was pretty laid back since he was fine with us having 3 cats and told us we had free reign as far as decorating and hanging stuff went, and I wasn’t in the hobby when we moved. He didn’t complain once I actually started up and he saw the tanks - he actually noted in the lease renewal that we were allowed to have four tanks after the fact.
 

ichthyogeek

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It really is going to come down to the building design and construction. Speaking with an engineer is going to be better if you’re trying to make a case for an aquarium and explaining live vs dead loads and placing the tank along exterior walls etc.

Unforuntately speaking with a structural engineer will cost money and even if your aquarium is approved as far as weight you’re still going to have issues with the landlord approval and renters insurance. I’d recommend first finding renters insurance that will for sure include coverage in writing or as a rider. Then speak with prospective landlords about your aquarium and explain the insurance policy and offer to make them the beneficiary of the policy. This will go a long way toward pacifying them.
Any suggestions? Lemonade seems cheap and efficient. Is there a specific statement that I should be asking for? Like, do I have to call them and be like "Does my insurance policy cover water damage caused by aquarium spillage in the event of emergencies such as earthquakes?" Or is there a better statement I should use?
Yes it is, and on top of that most people want to do a 3 or 4 x1 ratio so really you would have to build your structure to hold 375lbs per square foot. You will have to find a place that will allow you to be in the basement with concrete floors. Or in an industrial building...

But to be frank, it will come down to the landlord decision, they are the owners so they get to pick and choose who is in there place and what risks they are willing to take to rent the property.
I mean...I want a 4x2 ratio(I think). And then a 3x1.5 ratio. And a few more 3x1.5 ratios.....and a pond....

Can I ask for a clause in the rental contract that says "Ichthyogeek is allowed to have aquariums." or something like that?
 

Dierks

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Honestly you can ask for anything you like! The craziest part of real estate is there are no rules set in stone for negotiating any contracts except for things like you cant discriminate against age, race or religion. Most other terms are open to ask for so absolutely you can ask for a clause that states you can have aquariums. I assume the landlord will put a cap on that, but that is ultimately the property owned call.
 

Max_nano

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Can I ask for a clause in the rental contract that says "Ichthyogeek is allowed to have aquariums." or something like that?
Yep, I have an amendment to my lease which allows a 25 gal tank. I’m in SF and just moved this past summer. I looked at places and tried to stick to pet friendly buildings. I didn’t ask about the tank until I found the place I wanted and was approved by the credit check. I thought it would be good to have them see my finances before asking to have a potential liability in my apt.

The landlord was a master negotiator and asked me what size tank I wanted instead of saying what size I could have. So I was conservative said 25 since it is a second floor apt and I’m not sure how the building was constructed. I kinda want to ask them if I can go bigger if I decide to resign, but I’ve been happy that I decided to be upfront about it and have approval in writing.
 

Tamberav

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I have lived in many apartments and I just keep looking till I find one that is chill. This is usually run by a private owner and it like a large company/building. I have 3 bengal cats, a dog, and several aquariums. It is a side by side duplex so I live in one half of it. I do pay pet rent on the cats/dog.
 

eel_river_coral

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I have lived in many apartments and I just keep looking till I find one that is chill. This is usually run by a private owner and it like a large company/building. I have 3 bengal cats, a dog, and several aquariums. It is a side by side duplex so I live in one half of it. I do pay pet rent on the cats/dog.
This was my solution as a renter. I always went with private owner's who rented out locations and someone I could speak with directly. I often would just put down an additional security deposit as an addendum for pets/fish. Usually the landlord is just worried about financial costs of damage, they often will let allow pets/fish for another $1000 on the deposit but some of mine only asked for $100 which really wouldn't have covered damage from any of my pets had it happened, lol.
 

Max_nano

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This was my solution as a renter. I always went with private owner's who rented out locations and someone I could speak with directly.
this is a good point. I looked at some apartments from a big rental group and they had strict no aquarium/water bed rules. Dogs were allowed with additional rent, but they wouldn’t budge on the tank.
 
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