Hydrogen Peroxide

Humblefish

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Hydrogen Peroxide *** The information contained here is subject to frequent changes as I experiment and learn more about the usefulness of H2O2 ***

What It TreatsProvides temporary relief for Marine Velvet Disease. After a 30 minute H2O2 bath, the fish should be transferred into a Quarantine Tank (QT) and treated with either copper or Chloroquine phosphate.

How To TreatThe following is needed:
  1. 3% Hydrogen Peroxide (USP grade) – available at most drugstores or Walmart
  2. Large glass bowl or container (Avoid using plastic buckets/containers)
  3. Syringe or pipette (for measuring out the H2O2) and measuring cup (for adding saltwater to the glass bowl)
  4. Metal spoon for mixing (NOT plastic)


Directions:

1. Prepare saltwater for the bath by having it set to the right temperature and heavily aerating it. You can accomplish the latter by running an airstone or pointing a powerhead towards the surface of the water for at least 1 hour (longer is better). Alternatively, you can use Display Tank (DT) water or even from your Quarantine Tank (QT) provided no medications/chemicals are present in the water.

2. Add saltwater (using measuring cup) to the large glass bowl. Keep track of exactly how much water is added – either in cups or ml. (Do this beforehand if preparing saltwater for the bath right in the glass bowl.) Make sure your fish has enough water to swim around and last for 30 minutes without aeration.

3. Discontinue all aeration before adding Hydrogen Peroxide to the water. Using a syringe or pipette, add 3% Hydrogen Peroxide as per dosing instructions below. Dip the tip below the waterline and spread the H2O2 throughout the water. (Do not allow any air/bubbles to enter the water at this point.) After dosing is complete, gently stir the water using a metal spoon. The reason you want to be careful not to create any gas exchange/aeration once the H2O2 has been added is to prevent the atoms from releasing their bond and becoming just oxygen + water.

Dosing instructions: To achieve ~ 150 ppm H2O2 add:
  • 1.25 ml of 3% H2O2 per 1 cup of saltwater.
OR
  • 5 ml of 3% H2O2 per 1 liter of saltwater.
OR
  • 20 ml of 3% H2O2 per 1 gallon of saltwater.
4. Now it’s time to add the fish. Again, do not aerate during treatment. The bath water should be perfectly still. It’s okay to use a heater, but probably not necessary since the bath only lasts 30 minutes. Observe closely and remove the fish if showing signs of distress. The vast majority of fish will handle it just fine. After 30 minutes, remove the fish and transfer into a QT for further treatment: https://humble.fish/velvet/

ProsEffective, easy-to-source “pre-treatment” before fish is placed in QT with copper or Chloroquine. In this study, a single 30 minute treatment with 75 ppm hydrogen peroxide “greatly reduced” Velvet trophonts on the fish: https://www.researchgate.net/public...n_the_Pacific_Threadfin_Polydactylus_sexfilis

Cons/Side EffectsStill experimental so side effects are not really known. It’s possible some fish may not tolerate this treatment. Avoid using H2O2 on fish with an open wound or obvious infection. Although H2O2 is an antiseptic, it has been found to slow the healing process and possibly worsen scarring by killing the healthy cells surrounding a cut.

*** Further reading on use of Hydrogen Peroxide for fish:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa157 (PDF: https://agrilifecdn.tamu.edu/fisher...-Hydrogen-Peroxide-in-Finfish-Aquaculture.pdf)

http://www.masa.asn.au/masawiki/index.php/Hydrogen_Peroxide

http://www.masa.asn.au/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=212442

More info from the aforementioned study: https://www.academia.edu/23793309/T...n_the_Pacific_Threadfin_Polydactylus_sexfilis

*** At this time H2O2 is only appropriate to use for the following scenarios:
  1. Hybrid Tank Transfer Method: Hybrid TTM to treat all parasites!
  2. For temporary relief of velvet & brook. It can also be used as temporary relief for uronema; however the H2O2 will aggravate the red sores if a fish has an active infection.
  3. Bath treatment prior to entering quarantine. The fish may or may not require further treatment in QT. Best to observe for 30 days with black mollies alongside: Black Molly Quarantine
To be clear, I do not expect the above to be the "final say" on using H2O2. But research and experimentation into this new treatment is going to take time. What I'm trying to discourage is people taking liberties with the treatment, and just dropping the fish in their DT straight away after one 30 minute bath. Best to at least observe in QT (with no meds) for 30 days before doing that.
 
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Humblefish

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Any update on your h202 experiments? like what would be a scenario for using it? im quite intrigued
Experimentation is ongoing. However, I think a single 30 min, 150 ppm H2O2 bath ought to knock off the worst pathogens. This needs to be done upon receipt of the fish, and at this time it is advisable to still observe in QT for at least a month. Preferably with a black molly to help detect if anything slipped through the cracks: https://humble.fish/community/index.php?threads/black-molly-quarantine.55/
 

neil

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Experimentation is ongoing. However, I think a single 30 min, 150 ppm H2O2 bath ought to knock off the worst pathogens. This needs to be done upon receipt of the fish, and at this time it is advisable to still observe in QT for at least a month. Preferably with a black molly to help detect if anything slipped through the cracks: https://humble.fish/community/index.php?threads/black-molly-quarantine.55/
Ohh will do, what exactly does the H202 take off ? ich, velvet flukes? and i think im 100% convinced that i should atleast have a molly in my DT lol
 

Humblefish

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Ohh will do, what exactly does the H202 take off ? ich, velvet flukes? and i think im 100% convinced that i should atleast have a molly in my DT lol
"Surface" parasites & worms such as velvet, brook, uronema, flukes, turbellarians. What's uncertain is will a 30 min, 150 ppm bath 100% remove them 100% of the time. It's all about repeatability. The jury is still out regarding H2O2's effectiveness against Ich.

Also have you tried the H202 on hippos, anthias and wrasses?
Yes :)
 

drstardust

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I have a dream...that one day my QT will basically be a mini-FOWLR that I dose peroxide into twice a day for a month as the only protocol besides feeding medicated foods. Fingers crossed that results of Bobby's experimentation will make this a reality!
 

Humblefish

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Does H2O2 break down plastic? Is that why you advise using a glass bowl for dips? Thanks!
Probably not. It's purely anecdotal from here: http://www.masa.asn.au/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=212442

"Onsan" mentions the following:
I've noticed adverse reactions when using cheap plastic buckets, nothing that i can pin point but i believe there is the potential for the free oxygen radicals to act on the organic plastic, glass and stainless steel are inorganic and are effectively inert to the peroxide, safest bet to use inorganics so i recommended that.
Using a hard food grade plastic probably alleviates this concern. As that is what H2O2 is stored in. ;) However, it's just easier for me to recommend glass (which I know is safe) vs. ensuring the person on the other side of the computer screen is not using cheap plastic.
 

Humblefish

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*** At this time H2O2 is only appropriate to use for the following scenarios:
  1. Hybrid Tank Transfer Method: Hybrid TTM to treat all parasites!
  2. For temporary relief of velvet & brook. It can also be used as temporary relief for uronema; however the H2O2 will aggravate the red sores if a fish has an active infection.
  3. Bath treatment prior to entering quarantine. The fish may or may not require further treatment in QT. Best to observe for 30 days with black mollies alongside: Black Molly Quarantine
To be clear, I do not expect the above to be the "final say" on using H2O2. But research and experimentation into this new treatment is going to take time. What I'm trying to discourage is people taking liberties with the treatment, and just dropping the fish in their DT straight away after one 30 minute bath. Best to at least observe in QT (with no meds) for 30 days before doing that.
 

mattzang

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not fish related, but has anyone tried using h2o2 to deal with dinos? i was hoping just removing gfo would get them go away, but seems i'm not that lucky. from what i can gather 1 mL per 10 gallons of tank volume after lights out is apparently a possible win
 

Humblefish

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not fish related, but has anyone tried using h2o2 to deal with dinos? i was hoping just removing gfo would get them go away, but seems i'm not that lucky. from what i can gather 1 mL per 10 gallons of tank volume after lights out is apparently a possible win
I have never tried it myself, but I have heard that dosage will eradicate Dinos quickly. You can also treat some corals with 3% H2O2 (1/3 H2O2 + 2/3 saltwater) for 3-5 minutes. Make sure you rinse thoroughly (swish the coral around) afterwards in just plain saltwater.
 

mattzang

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cures dinos, cures most known external diseases, i think some people use it to combat algae too? clearly the greatest thing ever
 

mattzang

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so here's a new lazy QT idea i just came up with

150 ppm bath prior to entering observation QT with rock and sand and all that jazz
feed medicated foods for a couple of weeks
buy single head doser, set it to dose at least twice a day before and after lights out, although if there's no inverts or corals, could we get crazy with the doses here?
leave fish in QT for at least a month

that would even take out ich?
 

Humblefish

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so here's a new lazy QT idea i just came up with

150 ppm bath prior to entering observation QT with rock and sand and all that jazz
feed medicated foods for a couple of weeks
buy single head doser, set it to dose at least twice a day before and after lights out, although if there's no inverts or corals, could we get crazy with the doses here?
leave fish in QT for at least a month

that would even take out ich?
Ich could be the Achilles heel of H2O2. I'm not 100% sure of that one way or the other at this juncture. Fish with Ich (to experiment on) are hard to come by nowadays. I joked to my wife that maybe all the Velvet at the wholesale facilities took out "the competition" - Ich. :D

I'm currently researching the feasibility of combining other chemicals with H2O2 to specifically target Ich. Just in case. ;)
 

kyley

New member
Hey @Humblefish, a few quick questions... I just did my 2nd peroxide bath in the H2O2 TTM method (3rd transfer).

1. Does the H2O2 cause a big pH change? After I did the transfer the fish were breathing heavy and pretty freaked out. I had temp and salinity the same, but I tested pH after the transfer and the H202 water was 7.8 and the new water was 8.4 (just with an API pH test, so not highly accurate - the 7.8 may have been 8.0). Could this be why they're breathing so heavy, and is the H202 to blame?

2. The Exquisite Wrasse had Ich when I got it (pic below). Sometime after the first transfer, all spots were gone. Today, I see one spot that really looks like Ich. Would that be possible at this point? I've been careful and used all separate equipment for each tank and fully dried out the previous tank before using it.

3. If this is indeed an Ich spot, do I need to extend TTM longer?

Thanks,
--Kyle
624

625
 

Humblefish

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@kyley

1. H2O2 shouldn't cause a change in pH, but I will research the matter further to be sure of that. Maybe run some tests. API test kits are notoriously inaccurate/inconsistent.

2 & 3. I see many spots that could be Ich. However, they look to be above the surface of the skin so I am also wondering about flukes (or possibly even velvet.) Could you give the fish a 5 min FW dip to confirm or rule out Flukes as a possibility? https://humble.fish/community/index.php?threads/freshwater-dip.20/
 
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