POTM September 2021 Voting Thread

Users who are viewing this thread

Location
redlands, CA
Country flag
Submissions have been made and now we get down to the voting portion of the contest!

SUBJECT: Rare/uncommon fish. Not "rare" but, legitimately rarely seen in the hobby at all. An example, my fusilier damselfish. Prolific in the wild, but rarely seen in the trade. What they lack in looks, they make up for in behavior. I had 5, sold 3 after a month of trying to sell the shoal, and eneded up keeping 2. 100% peaceful. They actually change colors depending on whether chilling, eating, or scared.

Multiple votes are allowed!

Remember, only positive reactions count:

Screen Shot 2021-04-08 at 10.41.13 AM.png





Voting will close on Thursday, September 30 at 9pm CST!
 

Vette67

Still learning after almost 25 years reefing
Country flag
I know @Vette67 has a lavender tang.
I do. And I tell you, this fish never sits still, so it’s tough to get a clear picture And I mean it is ALWAYS on the move. I don’t think the Hawaii ban has caught up to these yet like it has for the yellow tang, but it will become harder to find as time goes on.
60688F98-2E81-4437-94ED-A177BAA513A6.jpeg
 

DexterB

Well-known member
Country flag
Bump!
As Matt said, think uncommon as in not seen in the hobby often.
This is a great opportunity to share seldom seen fish that you have successfully owned. Remember it doesn’t have to be ‘expensive’ rare.
Here’s a few old photos ( not for submission- just to keep party rolling).

I would love to see some of these from your tanks:
Hi Fin Red Banded Goby (Stonogobiops nematodes)
Convict Tang
Etc.

IMG_20170211_072817_711.jpg

IMG_20170910_124027_668.jpg
 
I’ll have to get a more current and better photo. Would this count. I think this is a Yellow Tail Damoiselles (Neopomacentrus Azysron). One of the fish experts can confirm.

F793E200-B06C-4B2C-87D9-9CDAD2A61849.jpeg
 

AndyR83

Way better at fixing people than fish
Location
Northeast USA
Country flag
4FF45F5B-17B8-40AD-9EA0-45BD9CC83FA1.jpeg
The Scribbled Arothron Puffer, also known as the Map Puffer, has a very distinct and vivid appearance. The main color ranges from light tans to dark yellows and it has a network of black "scribbles" covering the body, forming an intricate pattern. They typically reach an adult size of 24 to 28 inches in length, though some have been known to reach 36 inches or more.
 
Top